March 14th, 2003

amazon

The Friday Five (http://www.fridayfive.org/)

1. Do you like talking on the phone? Why or why not? I'm pretty indifferent to "talking on the phone" by itself. It's just a tool. There are some people it makes me happy to talk to, and when they are somewhere else, the phone is the tool for getting and sharing that pleasure.

2. Who is the last person you talked to on the phone? My ex.

3. About how many telephones do you have at home? Plugged in? Three. One regular landline phone in the bedroom, there mostly for the hopefully never used need for dialing 911. One wireless handset phone plugged into a Packet8 VoIP adapter, as part of a technology trial for work, and my AT&T celphone, which doesn't actually work in my apartment, even though it's my "main number". There are a couple of unused phones in the "tech junk and cables box".

4. Have you encountered anyone who has really bad phone manners? What happened? No, not really.

5. Would you rather pick up the phone and call someone or write them an e-mail or a letter? Why or why not? That depends on the person and the reason. Some people it's a pleasure to hear their voice, and sometimes the need for interactive turnaround time and moving around dictate the need for phones and especially cellphones. But I find it generally easier to use email. I don't stammer, repeat myself, and can edit my words and work up my courage.
amazon

Violent Fantasies of Retribution against JavaScript programming

There are some technologies who's designers, in a more just world, would be beat with a tire iron until their joints were shattered, and then thrown alive into a bonfire. These include the underlying design of SNMP, the design and details of Asynchronous Transfer Mode, all parts of the OSI specification, especially anything to do with X.500, the theory and specification of WAP, the theory and specification of CableHome, but absolutely most of all...

JavaScript.

I hate JavaScript. I hate the poor design of the language. I hate the poor specification of the language. I hate the fact that none of the implementations really match the specification. I hate the bugs in the implementations. I hate all of the implementations. I hate the model. It's just a poorly done Yet Another embedded scripting language. TCL already existed, was already debugged, already had people who knew it, and as annoying as TCL may be, everything that JavaScript can do, TCL does better. I hate the name "JavaScript". I hate the intentionally deceptive marketing towards microcephalic executives implicit in it's origin and naming. I hate that it's the prime enabling technology of evil web sites, of obtrusive web ads, such as popovers, popunders, and flypaper sites. And I hate the vast majority of the programmers who use it, especially the ones who both ignorantly or willfully use it to make web sites browser and OS specific.

One of my tasks today has been to explore and configure Wireless Bridges. These little dohickys are a good idea, on paper. If you have a 802.11 WLAN running, you take one of these little boxes, configure it a bit, plug one end into a PC, network aware STB, internet aware gaming console, network printer, whatever, and the device goes "on the net". A great idea, except that the makers of these boxes want too much money for them, and they are physically too large, especially when you take one apart, it's mostly empty space inside.

Anyway, there is also the problem that all 3 big names in this market have FUCKED THEM UP.

The Linksys WET11 would crash and reset about 3 times a day, and about one time out of 3, would wedge itself so bad it needs a power cycle, and eventually wedged itself so bad that even a factory-reset wouldn't bring it back. Scratch Linksys.

The SMC EZConnect I've got, the webserver running on it won't respond. I can ping the box, I can get basic SNMP responses out of it, according to SNMP, there is something listening on port 80, but TCP connections to that port just hang and die. Scratch SMC.

And now the D-Link DWL-810+. It reset, can be pinged, and the webserver on it will talk back to me. However, the configuration webapp on that web server is very very JavaShit based, and will make nice only with BillyShit Internyet Exploiter 5. Funny, I don't seem to have a copy of that on my Linux laptop. And I'm not going to sacrifice my windows workstation's network configuration to this project. (I may hate windows, but I do need to use Outlook for corporate email and calendering, and messing with that boxes is Not An Option.)

So there's a JavaScript programmer at D-Link who really needs to have his hands fed into a factory breadslicer press for doing this to me.
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